5. Sunday Post 8-7-2016

Wow this week went by fast! It’s been another productive week here. Read below to see what you have missed on Comma Hangover, and elsewhere on the internet.

This Week on Comma Hangover

Sunday: The Sunday Post // July 31, 2016 | Summer TBR Wipeout // Update #2
Monday: July Wrap-Up | Memorable Mondays // That Moment When You Discover Your Best Friend
Tuesday: Book Style // Little Nothing by Marisa Silver
Wednesday: Waiting on Wednesday // Wonder by Emma Donoghue | Audiobook Review: Landline by Rainbow Rowell
Thursday: Book Traveling Thursdays // A Lazy Day Read
Friday: The Vogue Book Tag
Saturday: Book Style // Jonathan Unleashed by Meg Rosoff


What Else Have I Been Up To

I’ve been reading Behind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris and listening to The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. Those reviews should be coming up later this week.

My TBR pile is getting out of hand, so I am trying to carve out more time for reading here and there.

This week I write one review for Tell-Tale TV. This one is for Pretty Little Liars. This week was Season 7, Episode 6,  “Wanted: Dead or Alive.”


Around the Blogosphere

Becca and Books compares your favorite Starbucks drink to your favorite genre. Mine was pretty accurate, although my favorite Starbucks drink just alternate with seasons. I have said before when I did The Coffee Book Tag that I can’t get enough peppermint mocha between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

A.M.B @ The Misfortune of Knowing discusses the dearth of literature surrounding pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood in “Motherhood: A Gap in the Literary Record & In Public Life.” This is a trend in literature that I started to notice after talking with my friend one day and A.M.B. writes really eloquently about it in a response to an article in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Let’s blow the myths out of bookstagram.  There are so many amazing bookstagram accounts out there that I sometimes wonder how they do it. Tonyalee @ Lily Bloom Books talks about how she bookstagrams and gives you some tips.

Katie @ Nerdy Girl Notes posts a letter to Elsa. The letter thanks Elsa for the positive example she sets for young girls struggling with negative emotions, and it’s a great new way to look this character who I’ve also seen praised for not needing a prince.

Rachel @ No Space for Milk discusses “Finally Getting Behind the Wheel.” This is a post I relate to a lot because I was also an anxious driver when I first started out. Fortunately, that’s been remedied now.

196 Flavors talks about how to make a traditional Brazilian Dessert called Quindim. This vibrant yellow dessert sounds delicious and a great way to celebrate the 2016 Olympic games happening in Rio this week.


Elsewhere On the Internet

ATTN: wrote a piece observing something fascinating about people who finish the Harry Potter books. Not sure this is entirely exclusive, but maybe there’s a correlation.

Elizabeth Olsen writes a very insightful piece for The New York Times entitled “Bar Association Considers Striking ‘Honeys’ From the Courtroom.” Very insightful article, give it a read.

Jezebel talks about dead girls and the internet. The startling trend that has been around for years and probably the reason why Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train are best-sellers.

The Harvard Business Review ran an article on “Why Women Feel More Stress at Work.” Hardly a novel concept, because articles have been written talking about how women feel more anxiety than men for years now, but this one actually breaks down why women may feel more stress.


That’s all for this week! What have your highlights been for the week? Any articles I should check out? 

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Posted by:Lauren Busser

An artist with a reluctant homemaker side. She writes about books, food, television, and generally anything that catches her interest.

6 replies on “The Sunday Post // August 7, 2016

    1. You are welcome! I am really having a problem with that myself. My friend and I were walking around NYC one day and talking about badass moms and we noticed not just a lack of pregnancy but also a lack of mother’s in 19th century fiction.

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